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OSHA makes your company do safety inspections. So do your insurers, your investors, your unions, your contractors, your state and local agencies. At times it may seem like a line of people is at your front door with pen and clipboard in one hand and a flashlight in the other, looking to nitpick and find fault. We invite you to move away from the mindset of the inspection as an annoyance, a deterrent, and a punishment, but instead look at it as a valuable tool with benefits far beyond those of keeping all the clipboard-wielders appeased.

Not convinced? Check our new guide to learn why you should love (or at least mostly tolerate) safety inspections, and explore the benefits including, but not limited to:

  • Improved ability to attract and retain employees. No one wants to work at a place that’s dangerous, or stay employed at a place that they feel isn’t safe. This works the other way around, too, as the longer employees stay at a job, the safer they are: a National Safety Council study found that about one-third of occupational injuries and illnesses were among those with less than a year on the job. As new workers gain experience, the risk of accidents declines, so keeping your workplace safe so workers stick around long enough to become experienced and less prone to injury presents a clear win for companies investing in a safety culture.
  • Getting more work. As noted in a buildings.com article, a contractor with a great record is “more efficient at reducing risks, being profitable, and completing projects on time” – all definite pluses when it comes to getting more jobs, winning more bids, and signing more contracts. On the flip side, contractors with substandard safety records will likely face hardships in getting past the initial stages of bidding, as a company’s safety record is often used as a prequalifying factor early in the bidding process, sometimes without the contractor’s knowledge.

But wait, there's more!

To discover more real-life, practical reasons why safety inspections might not be half bad, download our free guide today!

About the author

Linda is a Content Writer at Fulcrum.

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